Year: 1997

About the New Zealand post office

This is Google’s cache of http://www.jcampbell.com/rowland/pdf/country/nz/nzp_hist.htm.
Google’s cache is the snapshot that we took of the page as we crawled the web.
The page may have changed since that time. Click here for the current page without highlighting.

Google is not affiliated with the authors of this page nor responsible for its content.
These search terms have been highlighted: post mail letter

——————————————————————————–

New Zealand Post
About New Zealand Post Office

[From NZ Post website, 1 Dec 1997, graphics deleted.]

1986 State-Owned Enterprise Act passed in December.
Standard letter price raised from 30 cents to 40 cents on 1 February 1986.

1987 New Zealand Post becomes a State-owned Enterprise (SOE) on 1 April. The old New Zealand Post Office split into three core businesses – postal services, telecommunications and retail banking. SOE Minister announces that 432 Post Offices are to close with 560 jobs to go (16 October).
1988 New Zealand Post announces a first year after tax profit of $72 million and a 25 per cent cut in recurring costs (for year ending March 1988).

Post Offices became Post Shops (1 April).

A new corporate image launched along with a new corporate wardrobe for frontline staff.

Mail re-classified by size not weight, with three price steps – medium, large and extra large envelopes (a world first for the postal industry).

FastPost, the overnight mail delivery service, introduced.

A “clear floor” policy led to all mail being cleared out by the time the overnight transport was due to leave.

Datamail, a 50/50 joint venture direct marketing business established, offering business customers a bulk mail data processing and address labelling service.

Government announces its intention to sell New Zealand Post and deregulate the postal market (July).

1989 Government advises New Zealand Post that it had “decided not to proceed to full competition in postal services.” Instead, there would be a staged programme of deregulation (March).

Boxlink, a service for private bags and boxes, launched in February.

CourierPost and its innovative track and trace technology launched in August.

End of year after tax profit – $31 million.

1990 End of year after tax profit – $53 million.

New Zealand Post establishes its own airline, Airpost, in a joint venture with Airwork (NZ) Limited.

1991 Standard letter price raised from 40 cents to 45 cents.

New Zealand Post Properties Ltd established as a subsidiary 100 per cent owned by Post. Set up to manage 400 properties (reduced from 2000 in 1987).

End of year after tax profit – $30 million.

1992 Rural Delivery fee doubled from $40 to $80 per year (1 April).

Review of mail sorting practices in 22 mail centres resulted in a major streamlining of mail practices, reducing mail handling costs by 30 per cent.

A $20 million installation of the first of seven OCR – optical character recognition – machines in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch Mail Centres.

End of year after tax profit – $5 million.

1993 Elmar Toime appointed chief executive.

New business slogan developed: “People reaching people through New Zealand Post delivering messages, goods and payments.”

National Government pledges that Post would not be put up for sale in the foreseeable future.

End of year after tax profit – $37.4 million.

1994 New Zealand named ‘Company of the Year in the Deloitte/Management magazine top 200 company awards.

End of year after tax profit – $66.7 million.

1995 Rural Delivery fee abolished.

The company restructured into five main business groups – Letters, Distribution, Consumer, Post Plus and International.

The standard letter postage price reduced from 45 cents to 40 cents in October.

Synet Communications and Total Logistics Company (TLC) companies sold.

End of y

Read More

Guarantee of rural mail at same frequency (NZ)

This is Google’s cache of http://www.jcampbell.com/rowland/pdf/country/nz/min_97c.htm.
Google’s cache is the snapshot that we took of the page as we crawled the web.
The page may have changed since that time. Click here for the current page without highlighting.

Google is not affiliated with the authors of this page nor responsible for its content.
These search terms have been highlighted: post mail letter

——————————————————————————–

New Zealand Executive Government News Release Archive

——————————————————————————–

25 September, 1997

Hon Maurice Williamson, Minister of Communications

Guarantee of Rural Mail at Same Frequency
“Rural residents will continue to receive the same frequency of delivery service as now,” said Maurice Williamson Minister of Communications during today’s Parliamentary Question Time.

“This will be guaranteed by a new Deed of Understanding that the Government will establish with New Zealand Post Ltd.

“The Deed will also include undertakings that a rural delivery fee will not be reintroduced, and that New Zealand Post Ltd will maintain its nationwide delivery network and a network of postal outlets.

“Deregulation will provide postal customers with more choice in services and service providers, and without deregulation there is no guarantee New Zealand Post’s current level of service would be maintained.

“New Zealand Post has acknowledged the reduction in price for a basic letter was undertaken in preparation to meet increased competition,” said Mr Williamson.

Contact John Bullock, Press Secretary,
04 471 9972, 026 105 112
email: [email protected]

Read More

Deregulation of the postal service (NZ)

This is Google’s cache of http://www.jcampbell.com/rowland/pdf/country/nz/nzp_97a.htm.
Google’s cache is the snapshot that we took of the page as we crawled the web.
The page may have changed since that time. Click here for the current page without highlighting.

Google is not affiliated with the authors of this page nor responsible for its content.
These search terms have been highlighted: post mail letter

——————————————————————————–

25 June 1997

The Government announced its intention to introduce legislation to deregulate the postal service in April this year.

The Postal Services Act currently allows for competition in all areas of New Zealand Post’s business except domestic letters weighing 200 grams or less and costing 80 cents or less to post. New Zealand Post already competes in all other areas of its business: parcels, international mail, courier, financial transactions, contract logistics.

Under the current Deed of Understanding, the company is required to charge a nationally uniform price for standard letters; maintain a relationship between the price of the standard letter and movements in the Consumer Price Index; maintain agreed delivery frequencies to a specified number of delivery points in New Zealand; and operate a minimum number of retail outlets.

New Zealand Post has welcomed the Government’s decision to introduce legislation to deregulate the postal service.

The Postal Service Bill introduced proposes to: remove New Zealand Post’s present monopoly on the standard letter; allow full competition in postal services from a date to be advised; provide a transition regime to ensure New Zealand Post continues to meet social obligations provided under the Deed of Understanding and provides access to its competitors on fair and reasonable terms; maintain current provisions ensuring the security and integrity of the postal system, and extend these provisions to new operators; and provide for regulations to assist the co-ordination of box numbers and address information if necessary.

The company has been preparing for deregulation since corporatisation in 1987. Over the past ten years increasing competition and a desire to exceed customer expectations have been key drivers for the efficiency gains and service improvements the company has made. Customers have benefited from these moves with enhanced service and delivery standards, a greater range of products and services, an improved and extensive retail network, reduced prices for the standard letter (from 45 cents to 40 cents in 1995) and bulk business mail, and initiatives like the highly successful Free Post Day held last year.

New Zealand Post is committed to continuing to provide excellent service to customers throughout the country.

Read More

Governmant bill to remove postal monopoly (NZ)

This is Google’s cache of http://www.jcampbell.com/rowland/pdf/country/nz/min_97b.htm.
Google’s cache is the snapshot that we took of the page as we crawled the web.
The page may have changed since that time. Click here for the current page without highlighting.

Google is not affiliated with the authors of this page nor responsible for its content.
These search terms have been highlighted: post mail letter

——————————————————————————–
22 April 1997
Hon. Maurice Williamson, Minister of Communications
Government Bill to Remove Postal Monopoly
“The Government will introduce legislation today to allow private companies to compete with New Zealand Post in the delivery of standard letters”, Communications Minister Maurice Williamson says.
“The removal of New Zealand Post’s monopoly will allow full competition and offer substantial benefits for postal users. Opportunities will be created for a range of new service providers to enter the market and consumers will have increased choice in service providers, types of services and price packages.

“To ensure that universal service is maintained for the benefits of all New Zealanders, the Government will be putting safeguards in place. A new Deed of Understanding will be negotiated with New Zealand Post to guarantee the quality and frequency of service.”

“The price of the standard letter will remain at 40 cents and be capped at no more than 45 cents for three years following the introduction of full competition. This will provide continued price stability for the foreseeable future”.

The Minister says this legislation will contribute substantially to the objectives of the coalition agreement. “The coalition partners agreed to maintain an open, internationally competitive economy, by managing cost structures downwards and continuing deregulation. The coalition agreement also provides for New Zealand Post to be maintained in public ownership.”

“Once the legislation has entered into effect, new operators will be able to offer letter delivery services in competition with New Zealand Post from a date to be appointed by the Governor-General by an Order in Council. This is unlikely to be before April 1998. In the meantime, the present regulatory regime will continue to apply and New Zealand Post will retain its monopoly.

Ends

Enquiries: Bridie Wilkinson (04) 471 9974

——————————————————————————–

Proposed Postal Services Regime: An Outline
Under the Postal Services Act 1987, New Zealand Post has the sole right to deliver letters weighing less than 200 grammes, for which a charge of 80c or less is made. Once the monopoly is removed, other postal operators will be free to compete in all sectors of the postal market.
The Postal Services Bill introduced today will:

remove New Zealand Post’s present monopoly on the standard letter post;

allow full competition in postal services from a date to be appointed by the Governor-General by Order in Council;

provide for a transitional information disclosure regime to ensure that New Zealand Post continues to meet social obligations provided under the Deed of understanding (discussed below) and provides access to its network for competitors on fair and reasonable terms;

maintain current provisions ensuring the security and integrity of the postal system, and extend these provisions to new operators (provisions include requirements to pass on misdirected or wrongly addressed mail and penalties for unlawfully opening letters); and

provide for regulations to assist the coordination of box numbers and address information if necessary.

A new Deed of Understanding will be negotiated with New Zealand Post to:
(i) maintain the company’s service levels and scope of the present network at current levels;

(ii) provide a price cap on the price of a basic letter so that it cannot rise

Read More

Postal Services in New Zealand

This paper summarises key changes that have occurred in New Zealand since the corporatisation of the postal operations in 1987.

New Zealand Post Limited has made impressive gains in efficiency since establishment as a State-Owned Enterprise (SOE). It moved from a loss of $37.9 million in 1986/87 to a $75.2 million after-tax profit in 1995/96. This was a 4 percent increase over the previous financial year. The company’s improved overall position since corporatisation has been founded mainly on productivity improvements and better management systems. Improvements include:

– increased productivity: 40 percent fewer staff since 1987 now handle 20 percent more business;

– through a better, more efficient network configuration, NZ Post now has more outlets than before corporatisation;

– the basic letter price has increased just once in the five years since corporatisation (from 40c to 45 cents in late 1991). It was reduced back to 40c effective from 2 October 1995;

– the rural delivery fee was abolished on 1 April 1995;

– larger business customers benefit from volume and pre-sorting discounts;

– service delivery performance for a basic letter has improved sharply;

– the thresholds for NZ Post’s statutory monopoly have been reduced by more than half since 1988.

2.1 Background

The first post office was established in New Zealand in 1840 at Russell, and the Post Office Act 1858 established the postal service as a separate government department. In 1862 agency services for other government departments were commenced, as the Post Office provided an important communication network. In 1880 the Post Office was merged with the Telegraph Department

The 1986 Mason-Morris Review of the New Zealand Post Office recommended the separation of the organisation into three discrete businesses to overcome structural deficiencies which impeded the effectiveness of its operations. The Government agreed to this recommendation. Three State-Owned Enterprises were formed to take over the commercial functions of telecommunications, banking and postal and agency services, while the regulatory functions were transferred to the Department of Trade and Industry (now the Ministry of Commerce).

From 1984 steps were taken to arrest a decline in the profitability of the postal and agency services of the Post Office. The basic letter post price was increased in 1985 from 25 cents to 30 cents, and again in February 1987, to 40 cents per item. In the final year before corporatisation, postal and agency services incurred a before-tax loss of $37.9 million, principally on agency services.

2.2 New Zealand Post Limited

New Zealand Post was established as a State-Owned Enterprise on 1 April 1987 with an initial share capital of $120 million. As at 31 March 1996, shareholders’ funds were $207 million.

New Zealand Post is registered as a limited liability company under New Zealand’s Companies Act 1993. Shareholders on behalf of Her Majesty the Queen of New Zealand (the Crown) are the Minister of Finance and the Minister for State-Owned Enterprises. New Zealand Post Limited has a board of directors, appointed by the shareholding Ministers, and drawn from the New Zealand community.

Each financial year the Board and the shareholding Ministers are required to agree on a Statement of Corporate Intent (SCI) for the current, and two succeeding financial years. The SCI details the specific information required under the State-Owned Enterprises Act 1986, including the objectives of the company, the nature and scope of its activities, and the financial performance targets for the three-year period. The agreed SCI is tabled in Parliament, as is the Annual Report and Financial Statement of the company.

New Zealand Post Limited is also subject to the key agencies and legislation which review public sector activities. These include the Controller and Auditor-General; the Official Information Act 1982; and the Ombudsman Act 1975.

Under t

Read More
  • 1
  • 2

News Archive

Advertisement

MER Magazine


The Mail & Express Review (MER) Magazine is our quarterly print publication. Packed with original content and thought-provoking features, MER is a must-read for those who want the inside track on the industry.

 

P&P Poll

Loading

What’s been the most interesting trend of 2019?

Thank you for voting
You have already voted on this poll!
Please select an option!




Pin It on Pinterest